Egypt Independent: Life Style-Main news http://www.egyptindependent.com//enhome_channel/Life%20Style/rss.xml en Not getting enough sleep? Turn off the technology http://www.egyptindependent.com//node/2440616 <img src="http://www.egyptindependent.com///sites/default/files/imagecache/media_thumbnail/photo/2014/11/28/43/watching_.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-media_thumbnail" width="152" height="114" /><p><span style="font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; font-size: 15px; line-height: 23px;">Dependence on televisions, cellphones and laptops may be costing dearly -- in lack of sleep.</span></p><p style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 20px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px; ">The national penchant for watching television every evening before going to sleep, playing video&nbsp;<span class="mandelbrot_refrag"><a class="mandelbrot_refrag" data-ls-seen="1" href="http://www.reuters.com/sectors/industries/overview?industryCode=199&amp;lc=int_mb_1001" style="color: rgb(0, 110, 151); text-decoration: none; cursor: pointer; outline-style: none; outline-width: initial; outline-color: initial; ">games</a></span>&nbsp;late into the night or checking emails and text messages before turning off the lights could be interfering with the nation&#39;s sleep habits.</p><p style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 20px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px; ">&quot;Unfortunately, cell phones and&nbsp;<span class="mandelbrot_refrag"><a class="mandelbrot_refrag" data-ls-seen="1" href="http://www.reuters.com/sectors/industries/overview?industryCode=104&amp;lc=int_mb_1001" style="color: rgb(0, 110, 151); text-decoration: none; cursor: pointer; outline-style: none; outline-width: initial; outline-color: initial; ">computers</a></span>, which make our lives more productive and enjoyable, may be abused to the point that they contribute to getting less sleep at night leaving millions of Americans functioning poorly the next day,&quot; Russell Rosenberg, the vice chairman of the Washington DC-based National Sleep Foundation (NSF), said in a statement.</p><p style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 20px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px; ">Nearly 95 percent of people questioned in an NSF study said they used some type of&nbsp;<span class="mandelbrot_refrag"><a class="mandelbrot_refrag" data-ls-seen="1" href="http://www.reuters.com/sectors/industries/overview?industryCode=104&amp;lc=int_mb_1001" style="color: rgb(0, 110, 151); text-decoration: none; cursor: pointer; outline-style: none; outline-width: initial; outline-color: initial; ">electronics</a></span>&nbsp;in the hour before going to bed, and about two-thirds admitted they do not get enough sleep during the week.</p><p style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 20px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px; ">Charles Czeisler, of Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women&#39;s Hospital in Boston, said exposure to artificial light before going to bed can increase alertness and suppress the release of melatonin, a sleep-promoting hormone.</p><p style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 20px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px; ">&quot;Technology has invaded the bedroom,&quot; Czeisler explained in an interview. &quot;Invasion of such alerting technologies into the bedroom may contribute to the high proportion of respondents who reported they routinely get less sleep than they need.&quot;</p><p style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 20px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px; ">Baby boomers, or people aged 46-64 years old, were the biggest offenders of watching television every night before going to sleep, while more than a third of 13-18 year-olds and 28 percent of young adults 19-29 year olds played video&nbsp;<span class="mandelbrot_refrag"><a class="mandelbrot_refrag" data-ls-seen="1" href="http://www.reuters.com/sectors/industries/overview?industryCode=199&amp;lc=int_mb_1001" style="color: rgb(0, 110, 151); text-decoration: none; cursor: pointer; outline-style: none; outline-width: initial; outline-color: initial; ">games</a></span>&nbsp;before bedtime.</p><p style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 20px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px; ">Sixty one percent also said they used their computer or laptop at least a few nights each week.</p><p style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 20px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px; ">And a propensity to stay in touch means that even people who have managed to fall asleep, are being woken up by cellphones, texts and emails during the night.</p><p style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 20px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px; ">&quot;One in 10 kids report they are being awoken by texts after they have gone to bed. People don&#39;t turn off their Blackberries,&quot; said Czeisler, adding that much of this is happening at the expense of sleep.</p><p style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 20px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px; ">Generation Z&#39;ers, 13-18 year olds, were the most sleep-deprived group, with 22 percent describing themselves as &quot;sleepy,&quot; compared to only nine percent of baby boomers.</p><p style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 20px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px; ">Sleep experts recommend that teenagers get 9 hours and 15 minutes of sleep a night but adolescents in the study were only averaging 7 hours and 26 minutes on weeknights.</p><p style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 20px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px; ">&quot;I am the most concerned about how little sleep 13-18 years are getting,&quot; said Czeisler. &quot;Kids today are getting an hour and a half to two hours less sleep per night than they did a century ago. That means that they are losing about 50 hours of sleep per month,&quot; said Czeisler.</p><p style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 20px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px; ">Lack of sleep is negatively impacting work, mood, family, driving habits, sex lives and health, according to the NSF.</p><p style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 20px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px; ">All age groups are coping by consuming caffeinated drinks -- about three 12-ounce (354 ml) beverages per person -- per day, and taking naps, sometimes more than one during the day.</p><p style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 20px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px; ">&quot;Parents should get these technologies out of the bedrooms of kids if they want them to do well (in school),&quot; said Czeisler.</p> Fri, 28 Nov 2014 11:49:00 +0000 Reuters 2440616 at http://www.egyptindependent.com sites/default/files/photo/2014/11/28/43/watching_.jpg Supermodel Naomi Campbell launches Ebola fashion pop-up http://www.egyptindependent.com//node/2440604 <img src="http://www.egyptindependent.com///sites/default/files/imagecache/media_thumbnail/photo/2014/11/28/499612/naomi_campbell.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-media_thumbnail" width="152" height="114" /><p>British supermodel Naomi Campbell launched a pop-up fashion shop in east London to raise awareness of the spread of Ebola on Thursday.</p><p>Sporting a thick fringe and wearing a plunging grey dress, Campbell showed off party dresses, glittery high heels and other pieces donated by designers and friends to be sold at the store.</p><p>The &quot;Fashion for Relief&quot; shop, a fundraising drive founded by Campbell after the Hurricane Katrina disaster in 2005, will be open for one week at the Westfield shopping centre in east London.</p><p>&quot;Raising awareness for Ebola and educating about its prevention is crucial to help prevent the spread of this deadly disease,&quot; Campbell said in a statement ahead of the opening.</p><p>&quot;We hope the Fashion For Relief store will raise much-needed funds and awareness, whilst offering amazing pieces at accessible prices.&quot;</p><p>Campbell was joined at the launch by fellow Londoners rapper Tinie Tempah and actor Idris Elba, famous for playing character Stringer Bell in TV show The Wire and Nelson Mandela in a 2013 biopic.</p> Fri, 28 Nov 2014 09:03:00 +0000 AFP 2440604 at http://www.egyptindependent.com sites/default/files/photo/2014/11/28/499612/naomi_campbell.jpg UK Law Society scrapping of sharia advice is victory for women, NGO says http://www.egyptindependent.com//node/2440596 <img src="http://www.egyptindependent.com///sites/default/files/imagecache/media_thumbnail/photo/2014/11/27/43/604.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-media_thumbnail" width="152" height="114" /><p>&nbsp;</p><p style="-webkit-text-size-adjust: none; font-family: arial; font-size: 14px; color: rgb(37, 37, 37); line-height: 19px; margin-bottom: 17px; padding-left: 1px; text-align: left !important; ">The Law Society of England and Wales&#39;s withdrawal of guidance on sharia (Islamic law) wills is a &quot;great victory&quot;, but more than 120 unregulated sharia courts in the UK are ruling against women on a daily basis, a women&#39;s rights charity said.</p><p style="-webkit-text-size-adjust: none; font-family: arial; font-size: 14px; color: rgb(37, 37, 37); line-height: 19px; margin-bottom: 17px; padding-left: 1px; text-align: left !important; ">The Law Society, the professional body representing lawyers in England and Wales, issued guidance in March to ensure that wills drawn up by lawyers for Muslims complied with sharia.</p><p style="-webkit-text-size-adjust: none; font-family: arial; font-size: 14px; color: rgb(37, 37, 37); line-height: 19px; margin-bottom: 17px; padding-left: 1px; text-align: left !important; ">Rights groups said the guidance was endorsing discrimination against women and media reports said it was effectively embedding Islamic law in Britain&#39;s legal system for the first time.</p><p style="-webkit-text-size-adjust: none; font-family: arial; font-size: 14px; color: rgb(37, 37, 37); line-height: 19px; margin-bottom: 17px; padding-left: 1px; text-align: left !important; ">Guidelines set out in the Law Society note included advising lawyers that under sharia, male heirs generally inherit twice as much as female heirs and illegitimate children are not heirs.</p><p style="-webkit-text-size-adjust: none; font-family: arial; font-size: 14px; color: rgb(37, 37, 37); line-height: 19px; margin-bottom: 17px; padding-left: 1px; text-align: left !important; ">The widespread criticism led the Law Society to&nbsp;<a href="http://www.lawsociety.org.uk/news/press-releases/law-society-withdraws-sharia-succession-principles-practice-note/" style="-webkit-text-size-adjust: none; font-weight: bold; text-decoration: none; color: rgb(24, 62, 113); border-top-style: none; border-right-style: none; border-bottom-style: none; border-left-style: none; border-width: initial; border-color: initial; cursor: pointer; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; ">withdraw</a>&nbsp;the guidelines and apologise on Nov. 24.</p><p style="-webkit-text-size-adjust: none; font-family: arial; font-size: 14px; color: rgb(37, 37, 37); line-height: 19px; margin-bottom: 17px; padding-left: 1px; text-align: left !important; ">&quot;Our practice note was intended to support members to better serve their clients as far as is allowed by the law of England and Wales,&quot; Law Society President Andrew Caplen said.</p><p style="-webkit-text-size-adjust: none; font-family: arial; font-size: 14px; color: rgb(37, 37, 37); line-height: 19px; margin-bottom: 17px; padding-left: 1px; text-align: left !important; ">&quot;We reviewed the note in the light of criticism. We have withdrawn the note and we are sorry,&quot; he said in a statement.</p><p style="-webkit-text-size-adjust: none; font-family: arial; font-size: 14px; color: rgb(37, 37, 37); line-height: 19px; margin-bottom: 17px; padding-left: 1px; text-align: left !important; ">The&nbsp;<a href="http://ikwro.org.uk/" style="-webkit-text-size-adjust: none; font-weight: bold; text-decoration: none; color: rgb(24, 62, 113); border-top-style: none; border-right-style: none; border-bottom-style: none; border-left-style: none; border-width: initial; border-color: initial; cursor: pointer; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; ">Iranian &amp; Kurdish Women&#39;s Rights Organisation (IKWRO)</a>, which alongside other women&#39;s groups has pushed for the guidance to be revoked, has worked with thousands of women who have fled to Britain after suffering the inequality imposed by sharia.</p><p style="-webkit-text-size-adjust: none; font-family: arial; font-size: 14px; color: rgb(37, 37, 37); line-height: 19px; margin-bottom: 17px; padding-left: 1px; text-align: left !important; ">&quot;We cannot allow sharia law or any parallel legal system to take root in the UK,&quot; IKWRO&#39;s executive director, Diana Nammi, said in a statement to the Thomson Reuters Foundation.</p><p style="-webkit-text-size-adjust: none; font-family: arial; font-size: 14px; color: rgb(37, 37, 37); line-height: 19px; margin-bottom: 17px; padding-left: 1px; text-align: left !important; ">Progress made in the promotion of equality in British law should not be undermined &quot;by allowing the infiltration of sharia law, under which Muslim women in the UK are subjected to lesser rights than women under state law,&quot; she said.</p><p style="-webkit-text-size-adjust: none; font-family: arial; font-size: 14px; color: rgb(37, 37, 37); line-height: 19px; margin-bottom: 17px; padding-left: 1px; text-align: left !important; ">The last census in 2011 showed that Islam was the second most popular religion in Britain with 2.7 million followers, compared with 33.2 million Christians accounting for 59 percent of the population of 63.2 million.</p><p style="-webkit-text-size-adjust: none; font-family: arial; font-size: 14px; color: rgb(37, 37, 37); line-height: 19px; margin-bottom: 17px; padding-left: 1px; text-align: left !important; ">&nbsp;</p> Thu, 27 Nov 2014 19:37:00 +0000 Reuters 2440596 at http://www.egyptindependent.com sites/default/files/photo/2014/11/27/43/604.jpg Chocolate lovers tend to weigh less: report http://www.egyptindependent.com//node/2440582 <img src="http://www.egyptindependent.com///sites/default/files/imagecache/media_thumbnail/photo/2014/11/27/43/chocolate.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-media_thumbnail" width="152" height="114" /><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;"><span class="focusParagraph" style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans;">In a new study, people who ate chocolate a few times per week or more weighed less than those who rarely indulged in the sweet.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">The finding doesn&#39;t prove that adding a candy bar to your daily diet will help you shed pounds.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">But researchers said it&#39;s possible that antioxidants in chocolate could be behind health benefits including lower blood pressure and cholesterol, as well as decreased body weight.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">&quot;People have just assumed that because it comes with calories and it&#39;s typically eaten as a sweet, therefore it would inherently have been, one way, bad,&quot; said lead researcher Dr. Beatrice Golomb, from the University of California, San Diego.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">To test that theory, she and her colleagues used data from a study on cholesterol-lowering drugs that surveyed 1,000 healthy adults on their typical eating habits -- including how often they ate chocolate.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">The participants, who were anywhere from 20 to 85 years old, ate chocolate an average of twice per week and had an average body mass index, or BMI, of 28 -- considered overweight but not obese. (For instance, a five-foot, ten-inch-tall man weighing 195 pounds would have a BMI of about 28).</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">The researchers found that people who ate chocolate with greater frequency tended to eat more calories overall, including more saturated fat, than those who went light on the candy.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">Even so, the chocolate lovers tended to have a lower body weight. That was still the case after researchers accounted for participants&#39; age and gender, as well as how much they exercised.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">The effect worked out to a five- to seven-pound difference between people who ate five servings of chocolate per week compared to those who didn&#39;t eat any, according to Golomb.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">However, it was only how often people ate chocolate -- and not the total amount they ate regularly -- that was linked to their weight, the study team reported Monday in the Archives of Internal Medicine.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">Golomb and her colleagues noted that past studies have tied chocolate to lower blood pressure and cholesterol and better insulin sensitivity, possibly because of antioxidants or other chemicals in cocoa.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">The new report was funded by the National Institutes of Health and none of the researchers noted any conflicts of interest related to chocolate -- other than liking it themselves.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">One nutritionist who wasn&#39;t involved in the new research said there are a number of possible explanations for the findings that don&#39;t necessarily imply a weight-loss benefit for eating extra chocolate.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">It&#39;s possible that poorer people stick to the basics when they&#39;re buying food and don&#39;t eat as much chocolate -- and poverty has been tied to higher body weight, said Eric Ding, from the Harvard Medical School in Boston.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">Another possibility, he told Reuters Health, is that &quot;people who lost weight reward themselves with chocolate, more than chocolate causing the weight loss.&quot;</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">Ding said past evidence suggests antioxidants in cocoa called flavonoids are behind any benefits tied to chocolate -- especially dark chocolate, which has the most flavonoids.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">&quot;People know that eating the sugar and the fat won&#39;t cause you to lose weight,&quot; he said.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">Because the new study is relatively small and couldn&#39;t prove cause-and-effect, it&#39;s hard to take any lessons away from the findings, according to Ding.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">But the key for chocolate lovers seems to be considering calories and knowing that not all chocolate is created equal.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">&quot;If you consume chocolate, consume it in place of something else, rather than adding to your net daily calories (and) try to consume dark chocolate,&quot; Ding said.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">Both researchers agreed that moderation is important as well.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">&quot;This certainly does not provide support for eating large amounts of chocolate,&quot; Golomb told Reuters Health.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">Still, she added, &quot;For those of us that do eat a little bit of chocolate regularly, perhaps any guilt associated with that might be quelled.&quot; SOURCE: Archives of Internal Medicine, online March 26, 2012.</p> Thu, 27 Nov 2014 15:15:00 +0000 Reuters 2440582 at http://www.egyptindependent.com sites/default/files/photo/2014/11/27/43/chocolate.jpg