Egypt Independent: Living-Main news http://www.egyptindependent.com//enhome_channel/Life%20Style/rss.xml en Delta, United, Emirates lead the way on in-flight Wi-Fi http://www.egyptindependent.com//node/2475517 <img src="http://www.egyptindependent.com///sites/default/files/imagecache/media_thumbnail/photo/2015/02/17/43/fli-fi.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-media_thumbnail" width="152" height="114" /><div>Global airline passengers have a 39% chance of stepping onboard an aircraft equipped with Wi-Fi. According to an international report from RouteHappy, Delta, United and Emirates have the biggest number of available seat miles offering Wi-Fi access.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Air passengers&rsquo; chances of enjoying onboard Wi-Fi have increased 8% compared to last year, according to an international study, with more than one billion extra Wi-Fi-equipped seat miles available. Delta, a US-based airline that runs domestic and international services, comes top of the table for world airlines, offering the greatest number of seat miles with wireless internet access.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>The report&rsquo;s rankings are based on Available Seat Miles (ASMs) which are equal to the number of seats available multiplied by the number of miles traveled by the airline&rsquo;s planes. United Airlines comes in second place, ahead of Emirates, which has been committed to rolling out Wi-Fi in 2016 with 126 million extra seat miles now benefitting from the service.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>For long-haul flights, Emirates passengers have the highest chance of being able to surf the web, ahead of United then Lufthansa. The Dubai-based airline takes the lion&rsquo;s share thanks to its fleet of Airbus A380 aircraft, offering the highest passenger-carrying capacity of all current aircraft.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>European airlines trail in the rankings. After the German flag carrier, Spanish airline Iberia (12th), Air Europa (19th) and Scandinavian Airlines (20th) are the only other carriers flying the flag for European air travel in the Wi-Fi ranking for long-haul routes.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>In-flight Wi-Fi should improve further in 2017, as a host of airlines have already announced plans to launch services. Passengers can also hope to see the cost of surfing the web from 35,000 feet drop in the coming years. However, passengers may have to wait considerably longer to enjoy free onboard Wi-Fi on all aircraft.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div> Sat, 14 Jan 2017 11:18:00 +0000 AFP 2475517 at http://www.egyptindependent.com sites/default/files/photo/2015/02/17/43/fli-fi.jpg This is why you need to start running this year http://www.egyptindependent.com//node/2475515 <img src="http://www.egyptindependent.com///sites/default/files/imagecache/media_thumbnail/photo/2015/08/17/43/jh.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-media_thumbnail" width="152" height="114" /><div>New research which looked at MRI scans of runners brains suggests that those who run have greater functional connectivity in the brain than those who don&rsquo;t.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Carried out by researchers from the University of Arizona, the small-scale study look at the brains of 11 young adult cross-country runners and 11 sedentary control participants.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>All adults were between 18 and 25 years old, with the team choosing a younger population of adults for their study as most research within the past 15 years has focused on the effect of exercise on the brain only in older adults.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&ldquo;This question of what&rsquo;s occurring in the brain at younger ages hasn&rsquo;t really been explored in much depth, and it&rsquo;s important,&rdquo; explained the university&rsquo;s running expert David Raichlen, &ldquo;Not only are we interested in what&rsquo;s going on in the brains of young adults, but we know that there are things that you do across your lifespan that can impact what happens as you age, so it&rsquo;s important to understand what&rsquo;s happening in the brain at these younger ages.&rdquo;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>All participants underwent MRI scans which measured resting state functional connectivity, which is what is happening in the brain while participants are awake but at rest and not engaging in any specific task.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>The scans showed that overall, the runners showed greater functional connectivity &ndash; or connections between different brain regions &ndash; within several areas of the brain.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>One of these areas was the frontal cortex, which is important for cognitive functions such as planning, decision-making and the ability to switch attention between tasks.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><div>New research which looked at MRI scans of runners brains suggests that those who run have greater functional connectivity in the brain than those who don&rsquo;t.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Carried out by researchers from the University of Arizona, the small-scale study look at the brains of 11 young adult cross-country runners and 11 sedentary control participants.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>All adults were between 18 and 25 years old, with the team choosing a younger population of adults for their study as most research within the past 15 years has focused on the effect of exercise on the brain only in older adults.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&ldquo;This question of what&rsquo;s occurring in the brain at younger ages hasn&rsquo;t really been explored in much depth, and it&rsquo;s important,&rdquo; explained the university&rsquo;s running expert David Raichlen, &ldquo;Not only are we interested in what&rsquo;s going on in the brains of young adults, but we know that there are things that you do across your lifespan that can impact what happens as you age, so it&rsquo;s important to understand what&rsquo;s happening in the brain at these younger ages.&rdquo;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>All participants underwent MRI scans which measured resting state functional connectivity, which is what is happening in the brain while participants are awake but at rest and not engaging in any specific task.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>The scans showed that overall, the runners showed greater functional connectivity &ndash; or connections between different brain regions &ndash; within several areas of the brain.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>One of these areas was the frontal cortex, which is important for cognitive functions such as planning, decision-making and the ability to switch attention between tasks.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>University of Arizona psychology professor Gene Alexander commented on the results saying, &ldquo;One of the key questions that these results raise is whether what we&rsquo;re seeing in young adults &ndash; in terms of the connectivity differences &ndash; imparts some benefit later in life.&rdquo;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&ldquo;The areas of the brain where we saw more connectivity in runners are also the areas that are impacted as we age, so it really raises the question of whether being active as a young adult could be potentially beneficial and perhaps afford some resilience against the effects of aging an d disease.&rdquo;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>The results can be found published online in the journal Frontiers In Human Neuroscience.&nbsp;</div></div> Sat, 14 Jan 2017 11:00:00 +0000 AFP 2475515 at http://www.egyptindependent.com sites/default/files/photo/2015/08/17/43/jh.jpg This might be how stress and heart attacks are linked http://www.egyptindependent.com//node/2475479 <img src="http://www.egyptindependent.com///sites/default/files/imagecache/media_thumbnail/photo/2016/04/13/16030/afp.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-media_thumbnail" width="152" height="114" /><div><p><cite>(CNN)</cite>Scientists have long known that&nbsp;<a href="http://www.cnn.com/2009/HEALTH/02/24/anger.heart/index.html?iref=nextin">stress can influence your heart health</a>, but exactly how this relationship takes place has been something of a mystery -- until now.&nbsp;</p></div><div>Activity in the amygdala, a region of the brain associated with fear and stress, can predict your risk for heart disease and stroke, according to a study published in&nbsp;<a href="http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(16)31714-7/fulltext" target="_blank">the journal The Lancet</a>&nbsp;on Wednesday.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><p>&quot;The study produced several novel findings. It showed, for the first time in animal models or humans, the part of the brain -- the amygdala -- that links to the risk of subsequent cardiovascular disease,&quot; said Dr. Ahmed Tawakol, co-director of the cardiac PET/CT program at Massachusetts General Hospital, who was lead author of the study.</p><p>&quot;The amygdala is a critical component of the brain&#39;s stress network and becomes metabolically active during times of stress,&quot; Tawakol said.</p><p>He added that the study could provide new insights into how to reduce stress-related cardiovascular diseases.&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><div><div>Cardiovascular diseases -- a class of diseases that involve&nbsp;<a href="https://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/topics-objectives/topic/heart-disease-and-stroke#1" target="_blank">the heart</a>&nbsp;or blood vessels -- are the leading cause of death among men and women around the world, according to the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs317/en/" target="_blank">World Health Organization</a>.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>In the United States, more than&nbsp;<a href="http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/early/2015/12/16/CIR.0000000000000350" target="_blank">one in three adults</a>&nbsp;has at least one type of cardiovascular disease, and heart disease is the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.cnn.com/2016/06/30/health/leading-causes-of-death/">leading cause of death</a>&nbsp;in the country.</div><p>&nbsp;</p><h3>&#39;We were surprised&#39;</h3><p>The new study involved 293 adults who underwent PET and CT scans at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston between 2005 and 2008. The scans recorded brain activity, bone marrow activity, spleen activity and inflammation in the heart arteries.</p><div>Some animal studies have suggested that stress can lead to increased activity of cells in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4087061/" target="_blank">bone marrow</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3374089" target="_blank">the spleen</a>.</div><p>Next, researchers tracked the health of each patient for two to five years, during which 22 of the patients had a cardiovascular disease event, such as a stroke, heart attack or heart failure.</p><p>After analyzing the scans and heart health of each patient, the researchers found that higher activity in the amygdala was associated with a higher risk of a cardiovascular event.</p><p>The link between the amygdala and cardiovascular disease events remained significant even after the researchers took other cardiovascular risk factors into account, such as smoking, diabetes or hypertension.</p><p>&quot;We were surprised at how robustly amygdalar activity predicted hard cardiovascular events, along with providing information on the timing of those events,&quot; Tawakol said.</p><p>The researchers also found that amygdalar activity was associated with increased bone marrow activity and inflammation in the arteries.</p><div><div><div><div><p>Views of the amygdala, arteries and bone marrow of two adults, showing differences in low, left, and high amygdala activity.</p></div></div></div></div><p>The finding suggests a complex chain of events that might explain the stress and heart risk link.&nbsp;</p><p>Stress may activate the amygdala, leading to extra immune cell production by the bone marrow, which in turn may impact the arteries, causing inflammation, which could lead to a cardiovascular disease event, such as a heart attack or stroke.</p><h3>Stress has scientists scratching their heads</h3><p>&nbsp;</p><p><span style="font-size: 1em;">Still, &quot;the associations noted in this study, while statistically significant, do not prove causation,&quot; Tawakol said. More research is needed to replicate the findings in a larger sample of patients.</span></p><div>&quot;I&#39;d say the findings are definitely novel, show promise and bear replication,&quot; said Thomas Kamarck, a professor of psychology and psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh. He has written about&nbsp;<a href="http://www.apa.org/science/about/psa/2012/04/stress-cardiovascular.aspx" target="_blank">psychosocial stress and cardiovascular disease</a>&nbsp;but was not involved in the new study.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><p>Measuring brain activity to predict cardiovascular events is &quot;quite unique and interesting,&quot; Kamarck said. However, &quot;the implication of the paper is that this measure of brain activity can be used as a marker of cumulative exposure to stress. This, I&#39;m not so confident about and will require some additional validation.&quot;&nbsp;</p><p>That&#39;s because there has been much debate among scientists about how exactly to measure stress, Kamarck said.</p><p>&quot;There is no consensus about the best way to define and to measure stress,&quot; he said. &quot;One of my questions about the measure of resting amygdala activity used by these authors is whether it is best conceptualized as a marker of stressor exposure, stress reactivity or perhaps both.&quot;</p><p>Dr. Joel Dimsdale, distinguished professor emeritus at the University of California, San Diego, called the new study &quot;cutting-edge.&quot;&nbsp;</p><div>Though he was not involved in this study, Dimsdale has conducted research on&nbsp;<a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2633295/" target="_blank">psychological stress and cardiovascular disease</a>.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><p>&quot;Certainly, diet, physical activity and genetics play an enormous role in cardiovascular disease. However, this study demonstrates that how the brain perceives stress is also tied up with future risks of cardiovascular disease,&quot; Dimsdale said. &quot;It suggests a new approach for examining the links between stress, emotion and cardiovascular disease.&quot;</p></div><p>&nbsp;</p> Thu, 12 Jan 2017 14:14:00 +0000 CNN 2475479 at http://www.egyptindependent.com sites/default/files/photo/2016/04/13/16030/afp.jpg Giants of tomorrow: tallest buildings rising in 2017 http://www.egyptindependent.com//node/2475476 <img src="http://www.egyptindependent.com///sites/default/files/imagecache/media_thumbnail/photo/2017/01/12/16030/img_1066.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-media_thumbnail" width="152" height="114" /><div><p>China is raising the stakes in the race for the &#39;tallest&#39; man-made structures: six of the 10 tallest buildings predicted to top out in 2017 are in this booming corner of the world.&nbsp;</p></div><p>And all are set to exceed the 400-meter mark -- shoulders above 2016&#39;s additions.</p><p>According to The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat, a building is structurally &quot;topped-off&quot; when it is under construction, and &quot;the highest primary structural element is in place.&quot; Wuhan Greenland Center (above), will become China&#39;s tallest building when it tops out next year.</p><p>Predicting top-outs is an imperfect science, made difficult by factors including weather and financing.&nbsp;</p><p>Don&#39;t be surprised to see a few familiar faces among the jaw-dropping supertalls that are redefining our cities&#39; skylines.</p><div>Helping us out with our predictions is the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat -- the global referee for official building heights.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>We cross-checked info from its database against developer websites and forums for skyscraper enthusiasts to get the most accurate read on construction progress.</div><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p> Thu, 12 Jan 2017 13:53:00 +0000 CNN 2475476 at http://www.egyptindependent.com sites/default/files/photo/2017/01/12/16030/img_1066.jpg