Egypt Independent: Life Style-Main news http://www.egyptindependent.com//enhome_channel/Life%20Style/rss.xml en UK Law Society scrapping of sharia advice is victory for women, NGO says http://www.egyptindependent.com//node/2440596 <img src="http://www.egyptindependent.com///sites/default/files/imagecache/media_thumbnail/photo/2014/11/27/43/604.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-media_thumbnail" /><p>&nbsp;</p><p style="-webkit-text-size-adjust: none; font-family: arial; font-size: 14px; color: rgb(37, 37, 37); line-height: 19px; margin-bottom: 17px; padding-left: 1px; text-align: left !important; ">The Law Society of England and Wales&#39;s withdrawal of guidance on sharia (Islamic law) wills is a &quot;great victory&quot;, but more than 120 unregulated sharia courts in the UK are ruling against women on a daily basis, a women&#39;s rights charity said.</p><p style="-webkit-text-size-adjust: none; font-family: arial; font-size: 14px; color: rgb(37, 37, 37); line-height: 19px; margin-bottom: 17px; padding-left: 1px; text-align: left !important; ">The Law Society, the professional body representing lawyers in England and Wales, issued guidance in March to ensure that wills drawn up by lawyers for Muslims complied with sharia.</p><p style="-webkit-text-size-adjust: none; font-family: arial; font-size: 14px; color: rgb(37, 37, 37); line-height: 19px; margin-bottom: 17px; padding-left: 1px; text-align: left !important; ">Rights groups said the guidance was endorsing discrimination against women and media reports said it was effectively embedding Islamic law in Britain&#39;s legal system for the first time.</p><p style="-webkit-text-size-adjust: none; font-family: arial; font-size: 14px; color: rgb(37, 37, 37); line-height: 19px; margin-bottom: 17px; padding-left: 1px; text-align: left !important; ">Guidelines set out in the Law Society note included advising lawyers that under sharia, male heirs generally inherit twice as much as female heirs and illegitimate children are not heirs.</p><p style="-webkit-text-size-adjust: none; font-family: arial; font-size: 14px; color: rgb(37, 37, 37); line-height: 19px; margin-bottom: 17px; padding-left: 1px; text-align: left !important; ">The widespread criticism led the Law Society to&nbsp;<a href="http://www.lawsociety.org.uk/news/press-releases/law-society-withdraws-sharia-succession-principles-practice-note/" style="-webkit-text-size-adjust: none; font-weight: bold; text-decoration: none; color: rgb(24, 62, 113); border-top-style: none; border-right-style: none; border-bottom-style: none; border-left-style: none; border-width: initial; border-color: initial; cursor: pointer; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; ">withdraw</a>&nbsp;the guidelines and apologise on Nov. 24.</p><p style="-webkit-text-size-adjust: none; font-family: arial; font-size: 14px; color: rgb(37, 37, 37); line-height: 19px; margin-bottom: 17px; padding-left: 1px; text-align: left !important; ">&quot;Our practice note was intended to support members to better serve their clients as far as is allowed by the law of England and Wales,&quot; Law Society President Andrew Caplen said.</p><p style="-webkit-text-size-adjust: none; font-family: arial; font-size: 14px; color: rgb(37, 37, 37); line-height: 19px; margin-bottom: 17px; padding-left: 1px; text-align: left !important; ">&quot;We reviewed the note in the light of criticism. We have withdrawn the note and we are sorry,&quot; he said in a statement.</p><p style="-webkit-text-size-adjust: none; font-family: arial; font-size: 14px; color: rgb(37, 37, 37); line-height: 19px; margin-bottom: 17px; padding-left: 1px; text-align: left !important; ">The&nbsp;<a href="http://ikwro.org.uk/" style="-webkit-text-size-adjust: none; font-weight: bold; text-decoration: none; color: rgb(24, 62, 113); border-top-style: none; border-right-style: none; border-bottom-style: none; border-left-style: none; border-width: initial; border-color: initial; cursor: pointer; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; ">Iranian &amp; Kurdish Women&#39;s Rights Organisation (IKWRO)</a>, which alongside other women&#39;s groups has pushed for the guidance to be revoked, has worked with thousands of women who have fled to Britain after suffering the inequality imposed by sharia.</p><p style="-webkit-text-size-adjust: none; font-family: arial; font-size: 14px; color: rgb(37, 37, 37); line-height: 19px; margin-bottom: 17px; padding-left: 1px; text-align: left !important; ">&quot;We cannot allow sharia law or any parallel legal system to take root in the UK,&quot; IKWRO&#39;s executive director, Diana Nammi, said in a statement to the Thomson Reuters Foundation.</p><p style="-webkit-text-size-adjust: none; font-family: arial; font-size: 14px; color: rgb(37, 37, 37); line-height: 19px; margin-bottom: 17px; padding-left: 1px; text-align: left !important; ">Progress made in the promotion of equality in British law should not be undermined &quot;by allowing the infiltration of sharia law, under which Muslim women in the UK are subjected to lesser rights than women under state law,&quot; she said.</p><p style="-webkit-text-size-adjust: none; font-family: arial; font-size: 14px; color: rgb(37, 37, 37); line-height: 19px; margin-bottom: 17px; padding-left: 1px; text-align: left !important; ">The last census in 2011 showed that Islam was the second most popular religion in Britain with 2.7 million followers, compared with 33.2 million Christians accounting for 59 percent of the population of 63.2 million.</p><p style="-webkit-text-size-adjust: none; font-family: arial; font-size: 14px; color: rgb(37, 37, 37); line-height: 19px; margin-bottom: 17px; padding-left: 1px; text-align: left !important; ">&nbsp;</p> Thu, 27 Nov 2014 19:37:00 +0000 Reuters 2440596 at http://www.egyptindependent.com sites/default/files/photo/2014/11/27/43/604.jpg Chocolate lovers tend to weigh less: report http://www.egyptindependent.com//node/2440582 <img src="http://www.egyptindependent.com///sites/default/files/imagecache/media_thumbnail/photo/2014/11/27/43/chocolate.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-media_thumbnail" width="152" height="114" /><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;"><span class="focusParagraph" style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans;">In a new study, people who ate chocolate a few times per week or more weighed less than those who rarely indulged in the sweet.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">The finding doesn&#39;t prove that adding a candy bar to your daily diet will help you shed pounds.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">But researchers said it&#39;s possible that antioxidants in chocolate could be behind health benefits including lower blood pressure and cholesterol, as well as decreased body weight.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">&quot;People have just assumed that because it comes with calories and it&#39;s typically eaten as a sweet, therefore it would inherently have been, one way, bad,&quot; said lead researcher Dr. Beatrice Golomb, from the University of California, San Diego.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">To test that theory, she and her colleagues used data from a study on cholesterol-lowering drugs that surveyed 1,000 healthy adults on their typical eating habits -- including how often they ate chocolate.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">The participants, who were anywhere from 20 to 85 years old, ate chocolate an average of twice per week and had an average body mass index, or BMI, of 28 -- considered overweight but not obese. (For instance, a five-foot, ten-inch-tall man weighing 195 pounds would have a BMI of about 28).</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">The researchers found that people who ate chocolate with greater frequency tended to eat more calories overall, including more saturated fat, than those who went light on the candy.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">Even so, the chocolate lovers tended to have a lower body weight. That was still the case after researchers accounted for participants&#39; age and gender, as well as how much they exercised.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">The effect worked out to a five- to seven-pound difference between people who ate five servings of chocolate per week compared to those who didn&#39;t eat any, according to Golomb.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">However, it was only how often people ate chocolate -- and not the total amount they ate regularly -- that was linked to their weight, the study team reported Monday in the Archives of Internal Medicine.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">Golomb and her colleagues noted that past studies have tied chocolate to lower blood pressure and cholesterol and better insulin sensitivity, possibly because of antioxidants or other chemicals in cocoa.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">The new report was funded by the National Institutes of Health and none of the researchers noted any conflicts of interest related to chocolate -- other than liking it themselves.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">One nutritionist who wasn&#39;t involved in the new research said there are a number of possible explanations for the findings that don&#39;t necessarily imply a weight-loss benefit for eating extra chocolate.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">It&#39;s possible that poorer people stick to the basics when they&#39;re buying food and don&#39;t eat as much chocolate -- and poverty has been tied to higher body weight, said Eric Ding, from the Harvard Medical School in Boston.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">Another possibility, he told Reuters Health, is that &quot;people who lost weight reward themselves with chocolate, more than chocolate causing the weight loss.&quot;</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">Ding said past evidence suggests antioxidants in cocoa called flavonoids are behind any benefits tied to chocolate -- especially dark chocolate, which has the most flavonoids.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">&quot;People know that eating the sugar and the fat won&#39;t cause you to lose weight,&quot; he said.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">Because the new study is relatively small and couldn&#39;t prove cause-and-effect, it&#39;s hard to take any lessons away from the findings, according to Ding.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">But the key for chocolate lovers seems to be considering calories and knowing that not all chocolate is created equal.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">&quot;If you consume chocolate, consume it in place of something else, rather than adding to your net daily calories (and) try to consume dark chocolate,&quot; Ding said.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">Both researchers agreed that moderation is important as well.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">&quot;This certainly does not provide support for eating large amounts of chocolate,&quot; Golomb told Reuters Health.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">Still, she added, &quot;For those of us that do eat a little bit of chocolate regularly, perhaps any guilt associated with that might be quelled.&quot; SOURCE: Archives of Internal Medicine, online March 26, 2012.</p> Thu, 27 Nov 2014 15:15:00 +0000 Reuters 2440582 at http://www.egyptindependent.com sites/default/files/photo/2014/11/27/43/chocolate.jpg Five suggestions for greater self-confidence http://www.egyptindependent.com//node/2440578 <img src="http://www.egyptindependent.com///sites/default/files/imagecache/media_thumbnail/photo/2014/11/27/43/download_1.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-media_thumbnail" width="152" height="114" /><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px;"><span style="font-size: 1em; line-height: 22.986112594604492px;"><font face="arial, helvetica, sans">CONFIDENCE</font></span></p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 1.5em; font-size: 1em;">The dictionary defines it as trust or faith, being sure. I believe it means feeling good about yourself, especially in regard to accomplishing something. That something can be a new job, a new assignment, a performance review, networking, or a meeting with co-workers.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">Here are a few actions that will result in real payoffs in our confidence quotients.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">MOVE</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">No, not to a new job or neighborhood. Move your body. Take the stairs instead of the elevator. Park farther away from the store you&#39;re about to visit. Walk. Run. Ride a bike. Do yoga. Lift weights, even if it means doing your reps with a five-pound bag of flour in each hand. Work up a sweat. You&#39;ll feel better.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">The bottom line is, when we feel better, we become more confident. Exercise clears the brain and the lungs, making room for newer, better, and possibly bolder thoughts. It gives us more energy. And - let&#39;s face it - energy is attractive. Energetic people magnetize others.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">Nothing enhances your overall appearance like being fit. A good regimen of exercise will improve not only your posture but your personality. I believe that fit people look more focused and more confident.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">Exercise not only increases strength and endurance. I find, too, that it helps mightily to defuse anger and frustration, and it gets the creative juices flowing.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">TAKE A LOOK AT WHAT YOU ARE WEARING</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">There is no such thing as neutral clothing. Everything you put on represents a decision you have made and is a reflection of your good taste, your good sense, and your style. Remember, we judge others more on the basis of what we see than anything else. If your attire is inappropriate, colleagues are apt to question whether you know the rules of the game and whether you are or are not likely to be a significant player. Your superiors are apt to conclude that the quality of your work will match the quality of your appearance.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">When you&#39;re considering how to dress for a work situation, ask yourself these questions:</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">* Who am I?</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">* What role am I playing?</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">* How do I want to be perceived?</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">* Where am I?</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">* Who are the people I want to impress favorably?</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">We&#39;re not talking&nbsp;<span class="mandelbrot_refrag"><a class="mandelbrot_refrag" data-ls-seen="1" href="http://www.reuters.com/subjects/fashion?lc=int_mb_1001" style="color: rgb(0, 110, 151); cursor: pointer; outline: none;">fashion</a></span>&nbsp;statements here; we&#39;re talking about what works in a given environment to be effective.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">Grooming is everything. Develop four key relationships and you won&#39;t go wrong:</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">* Tailor: Good fit can make an inexpensive garment look like a million, while poor fit can make even an Armani look sloppy.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">* Dry cleaner: The chemicals can be damaging to fabrics, so go to a reliable establishment and inspect your garments before leaving the shop.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">* Shoemaker: We all notice other&#39;s shoes, mostly because we often get nervous and end up looking at the floor. Keep shoes well soled, shined, and in good repair.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">* Dentist: A clean, bright smile makes us feel better about ourselves.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">BREATHE</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">Find sanctuary inside yourself. There is honor in standing still. We are so time-crunched, information-bludgeoned, downsized, and multi-tasked that it&#39;s spiritually suffocating. Who we really are comes from the inside out. Without a way to &quot;go inside&quot; and focus, we add to our environment&#39;s chaos rather than its harmony.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">Learn &quot;belly breathing&quot;: lie down on the floor, be quiet and place your hands on your tummy. Breathe from your belly, letting your belly rise and fall like a bellows. Babies breathe this way and we know how self-confident they are. I&#39;ve learned to belly breathe on elevators, in rest room stalls, and in the middle of crowded rooms when I need to calm down and focus. No need to &quot;om&quot;.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">BE DISCIPLINED</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">Keep your agreements.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">Be on time.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">Be mindful and in the present.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">That is a gift to yourself as well as others. Whatever we think and feel now creates what happens in the future. When we stick to the &quot;now&quot; and don&#39;t chase rabbits, we are involved and aware of opportunities. Others we deal with will sense that we&#39;re fully with them. That has tremendous impact on the quality of our personal and professional relationships.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">GIVE AND RECEIVE</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">Give whatever you hope to receive in turn. If you want more cooperation and respect, give respect and cooperate. If you want to succeed, help others succeed. If you want more joy, be more joyful. When we circulate our positive energy, we create more and more to enjoy.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">* Be open to giving to yourself. Honor your own worthiness to receive or no one else will.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">Perhaps, as you read this, you are thinking, &quot;Yeah, so tell me something new. I know this already.&quot;</p><p style="margin-bottom: 20px; padding: 0px; font-size: 15px; font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', serif; line-height: 23px;">To paraphrase one of my teachers, &quot;Although we all know what to do, successful people do what they know.&quot; (Mary M. Mitchell has written several books on the subject of etiquette, including &quot;The Complete Idiot&#39;s Guide to Etiquette&quot; and &quot;Class Acts.&quot; She is also the founder of executive training consultancy The Mitchell Organization with the website themitchellorganization.com. The opinions expressed are her own.)</p> Thu, 27 Nov 2014 14:50:00 +0000 Reuters 2440578 at http://www.egyptindependent.com sites/default/files/photo/2014/11/27/43/download_1.jpg Heritage turkey breeders preserve Thanksgiving bird tradition http://www.egyptindependent.com//node/2440567 <img src="http://www.egyptindependent.com///sites/default/files/imagecache/media_thumbnail/photo/2014/11/27/499612/heritage_turkey_breeders_preserve_thanksgiving_bird_tradition.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-media_thumbnail" width="152" height="114" /><p>&nbsp;A tiny but growing number of the 46 million turkeys destined to be eaten in American this Thanksgiving can trace their lineage to the birds that graced the tables of the country&#39;s early settlers.</p><p>Cheaper, big-breasted turkeys full of the white meat consumers now crave have largely pushed out the historic varieties, but small poultry breeders are working to return the holiday&#39;s signature dish to its roots.</p><p>More than nostalgia, the movement seeks to preserve the genetic diversity of a famed holiday fowl, while also catering to foodies who prefer the robust taste of the heritage turkeys&#39; dark meat.</p><p>&quot;This is our historical foundation of our food,&quot; said Frank Reese Jr., a fourth-generation Kansas farmer considered the master of heritage turkey breeding.</p><p>At her homestead farm in rural North Carolina, Julie Gauthier butchered and dressed 14 heritage turkeys this week, plucking each feather by hand before selling the pastured birds fresh to customers who had placed orders as early as August.</p><p>The turkeys, also known as &quot;Standard Bred,&quot; can take twice as long to grow to full size and cost as much as six times more per pound than those popularly sold in grocery store freezers.</p><p>&quot;Heritage turkey is a superior product to a supermarket turkey,&quot; said Gauthier, a veterinary epidemiologist who also raises rare chickens, ducks and geese on her Wake Forest farm.</p><p>&quot;They&#39;re much more flavorful,&quot; she added.</p><p>The fowl included Beltsville Small White turkeys, one of the rarest heritage varieties that Gauthier and a national conservation group are on a mission to save.</p><p>The eight-to-12-pound turkeys saw brief success in the 1940s and 1950s after being developed to meet the demand of smaller families, refrigerators and ovens, but were nearly extinct by the 1970s.</p><p>The Livestock Conservancy started a recovery program this year for the Beltsville Small White, using eggs and adult breeder birds donated by a research lab with one of the variety&#39;s few remaining purebred flocks.</p><p>Compared with the 46 million turkeys the National&nbsp;<a href="http://uk.reuters.com/places/turkey" title="Full coverage of Turkey">Turkey</a>&nbsp;Federation estimates are eaten at Thanksgiving alone, only about 30,000 to 50,000 heritage turkeys are consumed each year, said Jeannette Beranger, who works at the Livestock Conservancy.</p><p>But the number of heritage breeding birds has increased after precarious lows in the 1990s, she said, and a core of enthusiasts are now interested in raising the animals.</p><p>Beranger has an idea to further raise the old-school poultry&#39;s profile.</p><p>&quot;We&#39;ve been chatting about how we can get a heritage turkey pardoned at the White House,&quot; she said.</p> Thu, 27 Nov 2014 12:38:00 +0000 Reuters 2440567 at http://www.egyptindependent.com sites/default/files/photo/2014/11/27/499612/heritage_turkey_breeders_preserve_thanksgiving_bird_tradition.jpg