Adel Iskandar

Adel Iskandar is a media scholar and lecturer at Georgetown University. His column appears every other Thursday.

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Opinion articles

Ten days before the March 2011 constitutional referendum, hundreds of soldiers went on a rampage in Tahrir Square, tearing up protesters’ tents, arresting dozens, and torturing them on the premises of the Egyptian Museum. Protesters were...
Yassin and Ali, both of generation Tahrir, were embroiled in a heated argument ahead of the presidential election between presidential candidates Ahmed Shafiq, Hosni Mubarak’s last prime minister, and the Muslim Brotherhood’s Mohamed...
I am no wordsmith, but I have a fascination with language. I am no grumpy grammarian, but I admire clean prose. I am no adherent to structure, but I appreciate good form. As a self-attested news junkie, I spend many hours of the day sifting through...
On Monday morning, Field Marshal Hussein Tantawi woke up and didn’t recognize himself in the mirror. Once the last man standing from Hosni Mubarak’s coterie, his day had finally come. On Monday morning, President Mohamed Morsy woke up...
In a span of 10 days, militants killed 16 Egyptian guards near the Israeli border, Amr al-Bunni died trying to collect his wages from Nile City Towers, and Moaz Mohamed lost his life to a burnt shirt in Dahshur. In Egypt today, tragedy and farce are...
Egypt’s revolution was leaderless, but not everyone got the memo. Today legions gravitate towards one notable or another, one visionary or another, one sheikh or another, one demagogue or another. There are those who self-describe as...
When comedian Ahmed Mekky uttered the Latinized acronym for the slang term “aha” in his film “H Dabbour,” he broke a taboo in the film industry. But because he spelled it out in English as “a7a” — to...
For 16 months, the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces has tried to convince us we are indebted to it for the revolution. In reality, it was the military council that was indebted to us for its newfound absolute powers. Today, there’s enough...
In August 1966, at the height of the Vietnam War when the United States was embroiled in a deep and lengthy conflict, a young fighter with considerable renown and popularity across the world became persona non grata for refusing to take part in his...
Being a non-smoker in Cairo is a tiring experience, never mind the inhalation of suffocating fumes from vehicle exhausts and hovering industrial smog or the annual mass combustion rice grains that sends a colossal billowing cloud over the city....