Maria Golia

Maria Golia is author of Cairo, City of Sand and Photography and Egypt.

www.mariagolia.wordpress.com

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News

If virtuoso violinist and composer Abdo Dagher were Japanese, he would have been declared a national treasure. As it is, his outspoken stance toward the Mubarak regime and its interference in Egypt’s cultural life meant that he was...
The revolution of 1952 was less the result of a clear, shared vision of Egypt’s future, than a consensual desire to break with the past. Like other nations emerging from colonial rule, Egypt wished to redefine itself in modern terms, as a...

Opinion articles

The battle for Egypt’s constitution is under way, with the opposition decrying the hastily composed document’s failure to guarantee civil rights. However, another compelling yet unpublicized reason for voting “no” in the...
Back in March 2011, I bought a T-shirt in Tahrir Square with a bold Arabic “no” written in black on the front and in red on the back, a message to vote against the constitutional amendments proposed in a referendum that took place...
It is horrific to watch military and CSF forces ganging up on defenseless citizens, on people who are actually running away without the least wish to engage in a fight. It is no less horrific, for me at least, to see civilians attacking soldiers...
“Egypt will have free elections one day — I will vote in those, but not these!” declared a long-time labor activist whose work I deeply respect. When I suggested he should vote he was angered. “Why should I participate in...
Egypt, post-Mubarak. That long dreamt-about era has finally arrived.  A new Egypt! Youth! Revolution! I wonder how many Egyptians imagined what it might be like, as the years paraded by, or if they imagined it at all. I often daydreamed about...
I honestly thought Hosni Mubarak would never make it to court, that the blow to his pride would kill him, or else like some ancient Roman noble, that he’d fall on his spear or slit his wrists in the bath to rob the mob of the humiliating...
There’s a Sufi parable about the fictional Mullah Nasruddin who is crossing a river by ferry with a learned man who asks if he has properly studied his grammar. The Mullah admits he hasn’t. “Then half your life has been wasted...
Several years ago, I attended a posh dinner party where conversation turned to Gamal Mubarak’s chances of becoming president. Most guests said they didn’t mind the idea and even supported it.  They were intelligent, well-travelled...
The clarity of purpose that characterized the best moments in Tahrir is now but a fond memory. Egypt is like a family in an inheritance dispute; the fraternal rifts formerly suppressed by the father/tyrant are widening. Divided along sectarian,...
I’ve sometimes wished I was a fly on the Mubaraks' living-room wall watching the drama unfold. I pictured the former president, his customary tenacity perforated with moments of genuine bewilderment, his sons’ and wife’s urgent...