Sharif S. Elmusa

Currently a fellow at the MacMillan Center at Yale University, and visiting professor at Georgetown University, Qatar campus, from the American University in Cairo, Egypt, where he is an associate professor in the Political Science Department. Elmusa received his undergraduate degree from Cairo University, Egypt, and his PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research and writing covers environmental politics, including hydropolitics, resources conflict/cooperation, culture and the natural environment, and the Israeli-Palestinian and Arab conflict.

Among his writings (apart from many articles in books and periodicals): A Harvest of Technology: The Super-Green Revolution in the Jordan Valley, and Water Conflict: Economics, Politics, Law and the Palestinian-Israeli Water Resources. He co-wrote the text of All That Remains: The Palestinian Villages Depopulated and Occupied by Israel in 1948.

Elmusa is also editor of Culture and the Natural Environment: Ancient and Modern Middle Eastern Texts (Cairo Papers in Social Science series, AUC Press). He is a poet and co-editor of Grape Leaves: A Century of Arab-American Poetry, and author of Flawed Landscape: Poems 1988-2008. He has also been an occasional contributor to Al-Ahram Weekly Online, Egypt’s English-language weekly.

Contributions

News

The following are segments from a longer poem — “Moons and Donkeys" — which I wrote after I spent a summer in Gaza in 1997. I dedicate them to the people of Gaza who are currently suffering and resisting yet another massive...
Since 17 April, some 2000 prisoners in Israeli jails embarked on an open-ended hunger strike to protest the conditions of their detention. News about an imminent deal mediated by Egypt and the Palestinian National Authority with Israel to respond to...
The following article is the first part of Al-Masry Al-Youm's weekly"Environmental Voices" series, in which issues related to the environment--whether local, regional or international in nature--will be discussed from the point of view...

Opinion articles

Looking for ways to improve my English when I first arrived in the US, I chanced upon a book about strong and weak words. It now strikes me how the reporting and writing about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is replete with weak words. What the...
When asked last September about a title for a talk I was to give at Yale University, where I am currently a Fellow at the MacMillan Center, I suggested “The Fog of Revolution in Egypt.” I spoke about three types of fog — the fog of...
Although motivations are notoriously hard to discern, it could be maintained that a primary objective of the latest Israeli offensive against Gaza is to shape Egypt’s post-revolution policy toward the Palestinians, especially toward Gaza,...
Now is a good moment to revisit the idea of a “technocratic government,” the type of government which the just-appointed prime minister Hesham Qandil said he intends to form, and which has circulated incessantly among the political elite...
  With the hunger strike of Palestinians imprisoned by Israel gathering momentum, I wanted to know names, look closely at faces, read biographies. During the prisoner swap agreement between Hamas and Israel last October, I was troubled...
In April 2010, the prominent Saudi cleric Mohamed al-Arif announced that he was going to make a trip to Jerusalem, then changed his mind under pressure. Two years later, Egypt’s grand mufti, Ali Gomaa, made good on Arif’s unfulfilled...
The recent poem of Gunter Grass, “What Must Be Said,” has stirred a storm of controversy in the West, as he meant it to do. The poem is, in a sense, an opinion piece in poetry form, which is part of its surprise in a world of prose....
Book censorship in Egypt is alive and well and may signal trouble for the country’s fledgling democracy. It serves as a distressing reminder that the old regime is not a mere ghost from the past. For most Egyptians, censorship might not be...
The present situation in Libya is quite fluid. Very few Arabs want the regime of Muammar Qadhafi to stay. At the same time, those who support the West's intervention have misgivings about its double standards. The Arab public does not like to...
Unaccountable power in Egypt is diffuse; so must be the resistance to it. The resistance should continue and spread, wide and deep. Otherwise, only the façade of the political system will become prettier, at best. Egyptians have begun to strip bare...